The most comprehensive travel guide to Africa      

Walking Safari

Walking has during millions of years been the most widespread means of transportation and a walking safari is probably the most intense and rewarding way to see and experience the life of the wild animals in Africa.

Walking safari in Masai Mara

Walking safari in Masai Mara. It is mandatory to always have an armed ranger accompanying you when walking in most National Parks and Game Reserves in Africa

A walking safari is maybe the most intense form of safari because all your senses are being utilized and you will feel the rush of adrenaline when getting close to the African wildlife without the safety of a vehicle, though some places like Crescent Island and Hells Gate at Lake Naivasha, there are no big predators.

Walking safari in Masai Mara

Walking safari in Masai Mara

However in most of the National Parks a walking safari will probably make you feel how the early humans must have felt like when walking amongst giants from the animal kingdom like elephants, rhinos, lions, leopards, hyenas as well as hippos and buffalos – the latter two species competing to be on top of the list of the most dangerous animals in Africa.

Walking safari in Masai Mara

Spotting game during a walking safari in the Masai Mara

But if you are accompanied by an armed ranger or some Masai warriors who understands the behavior of the wild animals, it is possible to leave the car and take a walk on the “wild side” to get a first hand encounter with Africa and her amazing nature – rivers lined by gallery forest, tall yellow grasses glistening with dew in the morning sun, blooming trees and a wealth of butterflies, a birds list hard to beat and an array of wildlife that covers all habitats and niches in the sprawling ecosystems of Africa.


Tourists on a walking safari on Crescent Island in Lake Naivasha where there are no large predators and it is possible to walk safely amongst giraffes, gnus, zebras, antilopes and other species naturally to be found on the African Savannah

Contact us for any inquiry at:

info@africa-expert.com

so that we can set up all the necessities for your next safari in Africa!

Walking in Africa

road in africa with people walking

People walking on a road in Ghana. Photo by Mikkel Grabowski

Walking is probably the way to go if you want to experience most of Africa and have plenty of time. Walking have been (and is still in rural areas) most common way of transportation and many people in Africa have no other option, than to walk many kilometers to fetch water, firewood or get to work and school.

Walking in a forest

Two men walking on a red road cutting through the dense thickets of Kakamega forest in western Kenya

But even for longer journeys and safaris, one can consider walking – maybe with the assistance of a few camels, donkeys or horses. John Hillaby’s book “Safari to the Jade Sea” describes some of the advantages and disadvantages of depending on camels for a safari.

Herders  outside Kalacha waving to tourists passing by
Nomads in Turkana region waving to tourists in a passing Land Cruiser

We recommend that you read this book before setting out on a safari with camels, or just read it because it is a very funny and amazing travel book that has become a true classic of African “must read” litterature. If you’re in Ethiopia and want to set out on a camel safari, a good place to buy the camels would be Babile camel market 40 km from Harar. In Kenya one can buy camels in most of northern Kenya; Isiolo, Samburu, Turkana, Marsabit, North Horr and other places.

Camels at a market

Camels for sale in Babile camel market in Ethiopia on the border of Somaliland

In some national parks walking is actually allowed, but only if you are accompanied by an armed ranger.

Contact us for any inquiry about your next safari or holiday in Africa:

info@africa-expert.com

Be Sociable, Share!

Post a Comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.

  • Africa-Expert

    Photography safaris in Africa

  • E-books

    Storytelling with film and photography in Africa