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Getting around in Africa

Getting around in Africa can be easy or very difficult depending on the country, region, destination and time of year. Flying is often preferred when traveling over long distances and it will save you time. But there are many other means of transportation too. Regional busses, trains, minibusses (Toyota & Nissans), city taxis, Tuk Tuk’s, Boda Boda’s, renting a car or motorcycle, bicycling or walking. And when going on a safari minibusses or four-wheeled vehichles are being used and such can be booked via tour operators in Africa. Each mean of transportation has it own advantages and disadvantages as described in the following articles regarding.

Local transportation in Africa

Long rows of Toyota- and Nissan minibusses awaits to be filled with passengers at the central bus terminal in Kampala, Uganda

Going to the national parks
In the national parks there are no public transportation so if you want to go on a safari, you will have to either have to borrrow or hire your own car, ride with some other tourists or book a safari with a local tour operator.


In the National Parks the animals always have the right of way and a minibus have to wait to pass as a pride of lions have taken place on the road in order to soak up the accumulated heat from the ground before the cool night falls in the Masai Mara

In Africa the roads are usually not up to american or european standards and one should always be alert. Especially driving at night is not recommended, as there are most often no street lights and pedestrians and animals use the roads anytime of day and night. If a car or truck has a mechanical problem become has been involved in an accident it is common to use some broken off branches, some stones or whatever is available to mark the road as a warning sign for other traffickers.

Accident on a road in Ethiopia

If a car or truck has a mechanical problem become has been involved in an accident it is common to use some broken off branches, some stones or whatever is available to mark the road as a warning sign for other traffickers.

Contact us for any inquiry about your next safari or holiday in Africa:

info@africa-expert.com

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